Categories
Poetry politics

Dear Politician

Dear Politician,

I write to you with a sad heart
Somewhere in my being I grieve
My blue ink run fast on paper
Like red from men on the streets
I wonder why you look elsewhere
Sipping your tea with disgust
While this nation fall apart!

Trust is a rare commodity
We gave all to you when we let you in
But you are now stronger than the people,
The same people who crowned you king

I remember your warm smiles
And the moustache I so admired
Now we lost faith, we no longer believe
In you and all you stand to represent

You attend grande parties
Your minions extort from people
You dance your merry heart away
Oblivious of this nation’s pain

Mothers lend you their children
They march away with pride
News reveal they are MIA or KIA
Another dream aborted while they slept

The police is not our friend
When young men are wasted
If one’s struggles finally yields good
You become automatic target

The voice of young men cry out
The blood of men wasted on the field
The sorrowful tears of mothers
This won’t prick your conscience

Listen carefully, we protest for our rights
We want to live
And we deserve some respect at least

Categories
Africa, Poetry and Love opinion Pastoral Poetry

Cranky Old Man: Anonymous Poet

A brief intro

When an old man died in the geriatric ward of a nursing home in an Australian country town, it was believed that he had nothing left of any value. Later when nurses were going through his meager possessions, they found this poem. Its quality and content so impressed the staff that copies were made and distributed to every nurse in the hospital.

One nurse took her copy to Melbourne. The old man’s sole bequest to posterity has since appeared in the Christmas editions of magazines around the country and appearing in mags for Mental Health. A slide presentation has also been made based on his simple, but eloquent, poem. This old man, with nothing left to give to the world, is now the author of this ‘anonymous’ poem winging across the Internet.

Remember this poem when you next meet an older person who you might brush aside without looking at the young soul within. We will all, one day, be there, too!


What do you see nurses? What do you see?
What are you thinking when you’re looking at me?
A cranky old man… not very wise,
Uncertain of habit… with faraway eyes?
Who dribbles his food… and makes no reply.
When you say in a loud voice… ‘I do wish you’d try!’
Who seems not to notice… the things that you do.
And forever is losing… A sock or shoe?
Who, resisting or not… Lets you do as you will,
With bathing and feeding… The long day to fill?
Is that what you’re thinking? Is that what you see?
Then open your eyes, nurse. You’re not looking at me.
I’ll tell you who I am… As I sit here so still,
As I do at your bidding… as I eat at your will.
I’m a small child of ten… with a father and mother,
Brothers and sisters… who love one another
A young boy of sixteen… with wings on his feet
Dreaming that soon now… a lover he’ll meet.
A groom soon at twenty… my heart gives a leap.
Remembering, the vows… that I promised to keep.
At twenty-five, now… I have young of my own.
Who need me to guide… And a secure happy home.
A man of thirty… My young now grown fast,
Bound to each other… With ties that should last.
At forty, my young sons… have grown and are gone,
But my woman is beside me… to see I don’t mourn.
At fifty, once more… Babies play ’round my knee,
Again, we know children… My loved one and me.
Dark days are upon me… My wife is now dead.
I look at the future… I shudder with dread.
For my young are all rearing… Young of their own.
And I think of the years… And the love that I’ve known.
I’m now an old man… and nature is cruel.
It’s jest to make old age… Look like a fool.
The body, it crumbles… grace and vigour, depart.
There is now a stone… where I once had a heart.
But inside this old carcass… A young man still dwells,
And now and again… my battered heart swells
I remember the joys… I remember the pain.
And I’m loving and living… Life over again.
I think of the years, all too few… gone too fast.
And accept the stark fact… that nothing can last.
So open your eyes, people… open and see.
Not a cranky old man
Look closer… See… ME!!


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The best and most beautiful things of this world can’t be seen or touched. They must be felt by the heart!

Categories
Africa Africa, Poetry and Love folklore Nature nature poems Pastoral Poetry Series

Tale of Wild Woods: Summer Arrives

When summer finally came, a lot had changed
The last snow melted and the sad land woke
Grasses started growing, covering the outer earth
So those who burrow scrambled out from the dust
Soft airs and tidings surround the mountainside
Sending sweet emissaries around the valley below
Vines, myrrh, mistletoes and pines sprout happily
In the morning, the sunshine will not glitter on ice,
Instead the heat grew and the wood inhabitants felt it
First, the Squirrels thought the world was going crazy
And their cousins, the burrow rats seconded them
‘The frog choir will soon resume’, a brown Cricket observed
‘And if they do I am going to go crazy!’ a Sparrow replied
‘Not if they played on a softer note at least’
A Linnet added to the conversation
‘No way, they have all got bass! Male, female all bass!!’
A sad Bee, which sat on the tip of a tree leaf answered
Now, fresh grass brought the Deers and mountain goats
At the Otherside across the rocky land, the Stream flowed
Leaps of water, joyful that her prisoner had let her free
‘Crap! I mean did anyone notice that the cats are back?’
Some stray mice broke the niches silence
‘They have our land smeared with urine, them Bobcats!’
‘Yes, they think it is their fatherland. Well we better hide’
Now the wolf pack had no cold anymore
So they prowled the earth with more ease
Picking trails of rodents through the thick woods
The Mountain stood, usually a still, motionless figure
One that kept some admirers intrigued
As the ice melted, water trickled down to the land
And the wild wood fauna felt sad for her
For they believed she was weeping at her loss
‘She has been like this since the Ice King left’,
The soft voiced black and white Pigeons sang
‘She is heartbroken! Why will the Ice King be so cruel?
He even took her icy cloak and see, now… now she is naked!’
A duck said closing the eyes of her young with feathers
‘I think she looks pretty amazing, so much joy in pain
No one cares much enough, I think she needs a hug’
A tortoise with a huge shell opined
‘No she needs a gift’, the Wolf pack alpha barked
‘She is the worst person I ever met!’ he added
The other animals had to retreat to their homes
Or if you are too small or slow, just find a hideout
For the wolf pack, the villains of the valley
Had no mercy and they do as their word sound
‘What do we offer her, a fine rose shrub maybe?’
Another wolf suggested as the roses around hid
‘No, well anything. If she continue that way
I bet you the streams will overflow and we will have no land
To hunt, to plunder and to rule!’
‘Well, if being solitary is the best way of getting rid of vermin
Then it is the best shot at self discovery’
The philosophical Woodpecker reasoned from the tree top

Categories
Africa, Poetry and Love Lessons from Experiences Love and Christianity Nature opinion reflection Series

Self Confidence

When you believe in yourself anything is possible.

Why not?

If you are lucky enough to find your passion, then how could giving up be an option? Giving up means accepting a lifetime of wondering what could have happened if you just believed in yourself enough to follow through. It doesn’t matter how fast or slow you go, just keep going and don’t lose hope.

But you may not achieve much if you are not self confident. So let’s consider attributes of a self confident person.

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Attributes of a self confident person

Smile: For me, smiles are facial dresses. People love and admire people who smile. Not the one that begins and ends with the mouth, the one that starts from the eyes. Genuine, loving smile attracts people, creates friendship and unlocks doors! Be a genuinely happy person and show it by smiling at people. Smiling makes one confident.

Humility: Humble people don’t lack self confidence! In fact it takes humility to have self confidence. When you learn to accommodate all class of people, you learn to serve others. That makes you grow dynamic and open minded. You also learn to be respectful and submissive to authorities.

Confidence: Confident people are attractive any time. Knowing who you are, pursuing your dreams, vision, passion and goals makes you a confident person worth investing in. When you find your passion you approach life with a positive mind set. You become energetic and believe in yourself. You have a sound self esteem and people are irresistibly drawn to you.

Friendliness: Being friendly is different from being desperate. When you go out, attend positive programmes, conferences, seminars, workshops, symposiums and serve in your local church or volunteer, you build a network and grow your confidence. So enjoy meeting people and getting to know them purely for friendship.

Generosity: Be generous to people. Be generous with your smile, love, talent, service, money, prayers, whatever you have that can bless lives. Generous people are like magnets, they never lack admirers. Compassion is a beautiful virtue. It builds self confidence.

Forgiveness: Forgive your past. Forgive all who disappointed you. Practice advance forgiveness, forgive people before they hurt you, because more people will offend you. If you find it difficult forgiving people, you will grow bitter and that kills self confidence when people stay away from you.

Intelligence: People like and admire intelligent people. Know when, how and where to talk. Know what is going on around you. Read about every topic. Know a little of everything. Intelligence builds self esteem.

Neatness: Dirtiness does no good. A disorganized and rough person lacks coordination to say the least! Take good care of yourself. Haircuts are essential. Tattoos and rings are not made for everyone. Appearing neat and presentable boosts self confidence. Because you don’t need to worry how you look or smell. Is it not said that cleanliness is next to godliness?

Dress sense: Wear something that fits you, not what is in vogue. Get a good tailor who can sew clothes that fits your body shape. Learn about your body shape and wear something that flatters your figure. Make-ups should be moderate. A good dress sense makes you sweet to look at and simply irresistible! Remember, the way you dress is the way you will be addressed.

Love yourself: You can’t love others if you don’t love yourself. Celebrate yourself and your uniqueness. Accept yourself the way you are, because you are simply the best. No one will be as unique as you. Don’t envy people because not everyone has what you have.

Godliness: Godly people carry golden virtues. Those virtues are in fact the summary of all attributes listed here. Honestly people find good godly people irresistible.

There’s a goldmine in you!

Take charge now. Start working on that talent. Bring your ideas to life and never stop believing in you. If not now, when? If not you, who?

Categories
Africa, Poetry and Love

Let that dream soar – Poem

Take charge today, be confident
Let the morning shine on your talent
But don’t just dream, bring life to it
Start working on your beautiful gift,
So it can soar and to other lives lift
It may be reasons why the world wait
But how will we know
If first you won’t believe in you?
So if not now when, if not you who?

Categories
culture/tradition lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry reflection rhyme tips

Imagining Love

Imagine riding a horse into sunset
Or sitting with kids to hear rare stories
Or listening to country late into the night
Or picking beautiful flowers & berries,

With the one you truly love…

Start a blog here.

Categories
lifestyle Pastoral Poetry reflection rhyme

Draw the Sun

summer-sun-wallpapers-1024x768

Draw the golden sun, let it shine on dreams,
Trust little beginnings, hope for the best,
Reach for the stars, live this colorful dream

Start you blog today.

Categories
lifestyle Nature Pastoral Series

Self Reflection 29: Perseverance

Fall seven times and stand up eight.

–Japanese Proverb

Categories
education lifestyle Nature Pastoral

Self Reflection 25: Diligence

If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as Michelangelo painted or Beethoven composed music or Shakespeare wrote poetry. He should sweep streets so well that the hosts of heaven and earth will pause to say here lived a great street sweeper who did his job well.

_Martin Luther King Jr

Categories
Poetry

Self Reflection 8: Success

Success is contentment, achieving little or much and leaving a legacy.

Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

Memories

You remind me of home, far away,
Fine memories I cherish each day

Categories
lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

Remember

Remember the setting sun will rise,
Tomorrow will become yesterday
And life must definitely find a way

Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral

First rain

First rain,
Strong wind,
We celebrate
The long wait,
And sniff the scent
Off the wet earth

Categories
lifestyle Nature Pastoral

Thank you

I feel better today. I think the malaria and stress is gone. I’m ready to start work again. Can anyone recommend a good editor and publisher? I’ve a drama and some short stories I’m considering to publish.

Thank you for your likes and support.

💛💙💜💚❤

Categories
Africa culture/tradition Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Poetry

Muse: Even Though…

Let me hold your hands, look into your eyes & sing,
For even though I fail sometimes, I love you still

Categories
Africa culture/tradition lifestyle

Happy New Month

Here’s to wish you all a fruitful month! Let’s march on to greater fruitfulness, open doors, good health and blessings.

❤💚💜💛💙

Categories
lifestyle Pastoral

Rusty ID

Earlier today, I found a rusty high school ID of me. I even dreamed to work for FBI as a little boy! 😀

All these while, I never knew I was the Batman. 😊

Categories
Africa folklore Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

A Farmer’s Love song

I picked a pretty fruit
Which reminds me of you
Grey eyes and elegant

There are many fruits
But you are just exotic
A fine and pretty sight

You are an amazing fruit
Like the seed of Sunflower
Sweet to keep my days light

You have become my fruit
The sunshine after darkness
My best friend; humble and sweet

Categories
Nature Pastoral

Images from John Okereke

I met John at the University of Uyo, Nigeria. I wasn’t sure what his talent was then. I’m now. Follow him at @putinpicturesJohn is a jolly good fellow…

Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore Igbo culture lifestyle Nature Pastoral

African Folklore

Folklore are tales, legends, superstitions of a particular ethnic population. In Igbo culture and other African societies, story telling is unique, such that it is a passage to transmit the tradition of a place from one generation to another. These tales convey the history, ancient messages and old knowledge. They teach morals and virtues to younger people. I’m privileged to remember some tales I was told by Grandma. I was very close to the older folk in the community and it seemed I learned a lot fast. I loved and still adore rural life. During school holidays, I travel with my aunt to stay with my Grandma (God rest their souls). I learned rodent hunting, swimming, wrestling and other kinds of play from boys of my age. Countryside life was one of simplicity and I enjoyed every moment.

Learn Igbo language here.

On one occasion, I recall traveling with my aunt and in the hurry forgot all my shorts save from the one I went on. As my Grandma had no boy and so couldn’t provide shorts I was made to wear skirts. It amuses me till this day when I remember this. I played with other kids in a red skirt! I was very little then, but coming from town I knew playing naked wasn’t my thing. So I went with skirts. My family still tease me. They call me Mr Piper, after the kilt-wearing Scottish wrestler and we laugh over it.

Most times, tales are told in the evening, after dinner. In extended and nuclear families, tales are normally told near a charcoal fire outside, preferably under the shed of a tree, on a moon light night. If the tale was to be heard by all, then it will be somewhere more open, like the village square. The story teller most times will be an elderly person. The little ones will sit still, listen and watch them. I guess this was the origin of my interest in story telling.

Mbe (Mbo), the Tortoise is the primary actor or villain in Igbo tales. He is portrayed as a shrewd person who cunningly gets what he wants and sometimes fails. According to my Grandma and my aunt, Alibo is the name of the Tortoise wife. I can’t remember the son’s name but this will not matter. There are other notable characters in African folklore. There is the dog, snake, boar, elephant, lion, crocodile, cricket, leopard and the rest. Mind you, the names one ethnic group give their characters may differ from another. I hope you continue to enjoy these tales.

Have a good night everyone.

Categories
Nature Pastoral Poetry

Muse: Thoughts of You

Nights may fall, crickets may call,
I sit alone, thinking of you

Categories
Nature Poetry

Muse: Promise

I’ll be far away,
Promise you wait for me

Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore Igbo culture Lessons from Experiences lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

The Rainmaker’s Tales: Beginning

When I am not making the rain fall
To flood the village and farms
And to make the river banks overflow
Then I will be watching the glittering stars
And talking to her, the night and moon
Well, the night is never complete without a tale
And this is for the sleepy little ones,
I shall tell you of the Forest and her folk

… The Rainmaker

***

Once when the Forests owned all the land
And the Forest King loved the valley greens
For it spread, such that the quiet mountain
Was covered with green grasses and plants,
The Wind adored the Mountain’s look
For during winter, she was terribly cold
That she felt absolutely nothing even for the Wind
She had no dimples, no smiles, no blushing
But the Tomato could blush and did a good job of it, anyway,
So each time the farmers called out to the tomato,
All she could was smile and blush deep red,
Now the Ice King wooed the Mountain and usually
Gathered around her face to give a warm kiss
But this never went down well with the Wind
For when the Ice King left with his captains,
And Summer came, the Forests grew their green
But the Wind felt awful all year round,
Thinking he was a big time loser!
The truth was that the lonely Mountain felt nothing
And was never meant for this young Wind

To be continued…

Categories
culture/tradition lifestyle Love and Christianity Nature

Take a Break

Do you feel overwhelmed by life’s stress? Then it’s time to take a break. Here are some recommended tips to stay relaxed:

1. Take a nap: It’s obvious that our body system is designed for rest. So enjoying some sleep is a good way to let off steam.

2. Water, Water and more Water : Water is life. The Earth and human body system is made up of water. So we can see the link between human beings and water. Some headache and stress can be fixed just by drinking a cup of water!

3. Exercise: Exercises are a great way to reduce stress. I remember that each morning I took a jog I tend to be proactive through the whole day.

4. Evening walks/Hangouts/Friends: Anytime I feel overwhelmed with work, I try to hangout with colleagues and friends. This normally takes place somewhere away from workplace or home.

5. Family: I’m a strong believer in the positive energy family can give. I know that families differ but if you really enjoy family time, you might find it comforting. I try to loosen up by talking to family members. We discuss warm memories and these memories are pleasant and gives a comforting feel.

6. Then I eat too: Hunger may cause stress to people. Trying to enjoy a well prepared and balanced meal can make one feel good. I’m a witness.

7. Music/Movies: Soft music can heal. Everyone have got songs that when it plays brings succour to them.

Take time to take care of yourself and to make yourself comfortable. You are the architect of your own well-being and comfort.

Categories
Africa lifestyle Nature Pastoral

View from my Backyard

Beware! There’s a furry ninja lurking in the shadows of this tree! Like when you see him in this slow-mo vid.

The trees here are home to many squirrels and birds and it’s just at my backyard! I have known these squirrels since I was a kid. This morning I patiently waited to watch them exercise.

My camera couldn’t capture the background hills exactly. I live up a hill, so it’s hard to capture a hill from a hilltop. I can never get enough of this view.

Ututu oma! Unu mere anwunu? Good morning. Hope everyone is fine. I’m returning to town today.

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Categories
Africa Nature Pastoral Poetry

Swift Breezes

Swift breezes welcome me to my hometown
My mind is at rest, for the love felt around
Palm trees are sentries, termites their soldiers
Cherries and mangoes throw fruits, sweet as sugar
Swift breezes blow through our quiet neighbourhood
I stand under tree shades, with my hands raised
When tree leaves struggle all about breezy Ovim
To enjoy mild acquaintance: my forever home!

***

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Categories
Poetry

400 + Followers!

Reflecting on my writing history I’ll say it hasn’t been easy. Writing from rural and semi urban Africa can be challenging; poor internet connection, little or no research resource and electricity issues. Despite all these, seeing your vote, like, comment, share or a new follower is an indicator that there’s progress.

For your support dear friends, I’ve got loads of thank you. I’m grateful. Your presence here fuels me. Thank you for being part of this African story.


Cheers and Love ❤

***

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Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore Igbo culture Lessons from Experiences lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

The Rainmaker’s Tales 2

Now it was tradition that young men
Cut wood in the neighboring forest
Before they are allowed to chose a maiden
There was no axe in the town and nearby hamlets
So young men did desperate things,

Mirtle was a young man, deformed in one hand,
Humbly dull, but very courageous
Youth of the hamlet, saw him as a weakling
And laughed for he was unfit for this great competition,
So they cared not to help him and such the men
Went deep into the heart of the green forest
Searching for wood, for there was no axe then,
Then appeared dwarves loitering about the wood,
Without food, water or warm clothing
Night came upon them each day
And they starved and want warmth
But no one cared or even looked at them
For the villagers loathed strangers
But not all, were bad mannered
Mirtle had compassion, though he was weak
And knew every night come gruesome
And that treacherous cold was her mistress
So Mirtle offered his food and warm cloths
To some of the weak and weary dwarves
Sharing with them till he had none left
So one night, the elder dwarf gave him a gift
Behold, it was a great axe!
And so Mirtle got some wood for a fair maid prize!
For his kindness to strangers who were in need

***

I had imagined and created this story to discuss compassion, love and kindness. It is even revealed that Abraham entertained angels without knowing it.

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Categories
Africa folklore Nature Pastoral

Ide Stream

We took a walk through Ovim. I decided to show my friends around. Just after Ugwu Uwaoma, we saw the table mountain. From the distance, it looked magnificent.

Further ahead, we came across the stream Ide, with her tide gliding smoothly through the green forest. The stream is deep and some fish trapping go on. Looks can be deceptive, huh? The stream’s murky waters are not what it seem at closer look. We took several images and made a video.

An aunt informed me a python was killed yesterday, at a neighbour’s compound in Umukwu but I arrived late to investigate that.

Categories
Africa culture/tradition Nature Pastoral Series

Adieu Sister: Chioma Iroegbu

In few hours I’ll be heading to my hometown, Ovim for my elder sister’s burial.

I’m not sure how I feel right now but I know I’ll be fine. I’ll stay back after the burial for a couple of days to help sort things out and to meet other extended family members.

Please keep me in your prayers. Have a great day.

Categories
folklore Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Poetry

Love Challenge 10

Twist and turns, hills and valley,
Day and night, your love is home

Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore Nature Pastoral Series

Diary of a Village Boy: The Leopard Spirit 5

When I reached home that evening, it seemed like the whole world was turned upside down. I felt my head swell as the bee stings and sharp roots hurt my foot. By the side of my bamboo bed Nene and her dog sat, staring at me. She held my hand and squeezed softly. I saw her beautiful face through the moon light when she leaned over to kiss me. She was sobbing.

“Get well brother,” she said as she kissed my cheek. Ah! Nene seldom addressed me that way. I was always the big head or a naughty boy. I tried to smile at her but my pain won’t let me. I laid back speechless and she left with her dog.

Outside the hut, a lot went on. Many girls from my community brought water to fill our tanks. Few came into my room to help massage my body; pulling my legs and hands as they smeared shea butter, honey and other ointments all over me. I was still in pains when Fata walked in. Then I felt my heart dance to the moon. But I couldn’t hide my pain.

Fata, ah Fata! My secret crush. The girl that played the strings of my heart. Her colour was chocolate and she spoke softly. When she walked she looked like a graceful deer. She always held her head high like a proud peacock. Her pretty face was like soft roses. But I never had the courage to tell her how I felt. I still wonder how other boys did it, how they started conversations with girls.

“They are too proud!” I argued, as a flashback interrupted my thought. It was during the wrestling season in the village, just after the match between the legendary Mazi Agbareke, the Gorilla and cunny Mazi Kene, the Tiger. We were waiting for the next bout when we discovered a group of girls in the crowd, standing opposite to us. From our stand we imagined that the girls discussed about the boys as we watched them laugh and clap their hands.

“They must be musing over your big head.” Onu said, as he turned to look at me. The other boys slapped their thighs and laughed.

“Wait oo. Please can you all take a look at my head and Onu’s and decide for yourselves who should go home with the title of Isiuwa, alias world head?” I replied. More laughter followed. “These girls are scared of this drum you call head!” I said pointing at Onu’s head.

“Okay o. I may have a big head,” Onu admitted. “But it is not empty. I can talk to girls and they like me but you barely can stand them. You dream of a girl who doesn’t care if you exist.” With that, Onu won the fight and I decided to steer the conversation in another direction.

Now Fata’s sudden appearance in my room brought back my fears but I vowed to talk to her that evening.

********

Men, women, girls and boys gathered in my father’s compound to hear my story. Nearly everyone from the community sent an emissary. Gifts accompanied the visits too, for the Igbo people believed in onye aghala nwanne ya (do not abandon your own) philosophy.

My father with some men and hunting dogs formed a small search party to comb the surrounding forests. A score of younger men were asked to protect the village in their absence. The evening breeze gave way to night’s treacherous cover and thousands of singing crickets began their procession. It was usual to enjoy the night airs and listen to folklore but this evening things were not well.

My mother with the help of other women cooked for everyone that came. Yam and vegetable soup was prepared. A huge fire was made around the entrance to our compound to keep away Wild Dogs and Hyena. I heard Mama and her maids tore through the barn to fetch yams. The huge basket hovering over the charcoal fire in the kitchen was brought down. It was rare to see Mama take fish from that basket. I only recalled that she opened it during festive seasons like the New Yam Festival. I was aware that this basket kept most of Mama’s smoked fish and it was every child’s dream to steal a piece of tasty fish from it. Girls gathered Water-leaf, Spinach and Greens from the neighbouring gardens. Some of the visitors came with mats and was prepared to stay till daybreak.

That night I had another attack. It was midnight and everybody was settled for some sleep.

… To be continued…

***

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Categories
Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

Love Challenge 9B

Just call on my name, I’ll be there
To show you how much I care

Categories
Africa culture/tradition lifestyle Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

Love Challenge 9

I love to stare into your eyes
That’s my favourite place to be

Categories
Africa lifestyle Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

Love Challenge 8

Memories flood my big head
But I find it joyful to say few
I count myself graced for your love

Categories
Africa education Nature Pastoral

African Landscapes

These images represent different African landscapes…

Can you identify the Sahara, Kalahari and veldt?

Categories
Africa lifestyle Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

Love Challenge 7

You are loved and admired
I am your biggest fan and friend
You are God’s gift and love to me

Categories
Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Poetry

Love Challenge 6B

Your words become silent lyrics to my soul
When every evening we lay in each others arms
Letting our thoughts roar with the warm fire
Dreaming, resting by the fireside, away
From the world and her noisy hustle

Categories
Africa Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

Love Challenge 6

The hair on your hands are like reeds
That flourish by the river side
Light chocolate is your skin colour

Categories
Africa Nature Pastoral Poetry

The Cricket’s Sorrow

I laid my bones down to rest
An airy night, dark and quiet,
When a thought swept over me
I was still awake
When I heard it
I heard it screech
A cold voice, not far from me
I paused, listened
A neighbor coughed from the next flat and bothered it
So quietness stayed for a while

Another screech
I kept mute to hear it speak…

Ihttttcchh, what a painful world,
A disturbed place, a confused one,
Less trees, lesser shrubs
Less green places for little fauns
Dark places, carbon profits
Hotter days and nights
And yet all they do is sit
To clamour for more wealth!’

I could feel her pain
I could almost touch it
I see myself in her shoes

And wonder what may become
Of this beautiful Earth

***

Dedicated to those who genuinely fight to keep the Earth from dying and to all trees and shrubs in the forests, that still sustain human life, everywhere, anywhere.