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The Frogs and the Well

Look at this fable and reflect why we should think twice before acting.

Two frogs lived together in a marsh. But one hot summer the marsh dried up and they left it to look for another place to live in, for frogs like damp places of they can get them. By and by they came to a deep well, and one of them looked down into it and said to the other, “This looks a nice cool place. Let us jump in and settle here.” But the other, who had a wiser head on his shoulders, replied, “Not so fast, my friend. Supposing this well dried up like the marsh, how should we get out again?”

The prudent person looks before leaping.

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Africa folklore Pastoral Uncategorized

Self-Control: The Fox and the Crow

How is everybody today? What are you guys reading for the weekend? I’m compiling a new reading list, anyone willing to share or suggest a book?

It’s almost bedtime here, but sleep can wait. I’m trying to study my guide to scholarship application.

I have this bedtime tale to drop before I retire for the night. Remember to share with young ones, for in this world of pride, selfishness and immorality, self-control lights the path of the prudent.

Vanity is largely a matter of Self-Control, or lack thereof. Others may try to feed our ego, but it is up to us to constrain it.

A coal black Crow once stole a piece of meat. She flew to a tree and held the meat in her beak.

A Fox, who saw her, wanted the meat for himself, so he looked up into the tree and said, “How beautiful you are my friend! Your feathers are fairer than the Dove’s. Is your voice as sweet as your form is beautiful? If so, you must be the Queen of birds.”

The Crow was so happy in his praise that she opened her mouth to show how she could sing. Down fell the piece of meat.

The Fox seized upon it and ran away.

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Kindness: The Lion and the Mouse

Here is one of the oldest and best loved stories of kindness paid and repaid. From it we learn that compassion lies within the power of both the mighty and the meek. Kindness is not a feeble virtue.

One day a great lion lay asleep in the sunshine. A little mouse ran across his paw and wakened him. The great lion was just going to eat him up when the little mouse cried, “Oh, please, let me go sir. Some day I may help you.”

The Lion laughed at the thought that the little mouse could be of any use to him. But he was good-natured lion, and he set the mouse free.

Not long after, the lion was caught in a net. He tugged and pulled with all his might, but the ropes were too strong. Then he roared loudly. The little mouse heard him and ran to the spot.

“Be still, dear Lion and I shall set you free. I will gnaw the ropes.”

With his sharp little teeth, the mouse cut the ropes and the Lion came out of the net.

“You laughed at me once,” said the mouse. “You thought I was too little to do you a good turn. But see, you owe your life to a poor little mouse.”

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Nature Pastoral

The Boy Who Cried “Wolf”

This is one of Aesop’s most famous fable. It’s old but not rusty. As you read through note that the fastest way to lose what we call our good character is to lose our honesty.

There was once a shepherd boy who kept his flock at a little distance from the village. Once he thought he would play a trick on the villagers and have some fun at their expense. So he ran toward the village crying out, with all his might:

“Wolf! Wolf! Come and help! The wolves are at my lambs!”

The kind villagers left their work and ran to the field to help him. But when they got there the boy laughed at them for their pains; there was no wolf there.

Still another day the boy tried the same trick, and the villagers came running to help and were laughed at again.

Then one day a wolf did break into the fold and began killing the lambs. In great fright, the boy ran back for help. “Wolf! Wolf!” He screamed. “There is a wolf in the flock! Help!”

The villagers heard him, but they thought it was another mean trick; no one paid the least attention, or went near him. And the shepherd boy lost all his sheep.

That is the kind of thing that happens to people who lie: even when they do tell the truth they will not be believed.