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Africa education folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral

Good morning Africa

Thank you for reminding me of your beauty Africa. #Africanimages

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Africa culture/tradition education folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral

Movie: The Ghost and the Darkness

As we observe our social distancing, I started seeing old favourite movies. I remember this historic film back in the days. Trust me, this is a thriller you will enjoy. Plot from Wikipedia.

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Plot: In 1898, Sir Robert Beaumont, the primary financier of a railroad project in Tsavo, Kenya, is furious because the project is running behind schedule. He seeks out the expertise of Lt. Colonel John Henry Patterson, a British military engineer, to get the project back on track. Patterson travels from England to Tsavo, telling his wife, Helena, he will complete the project and be back in London for the birth of their son. He meets British supervisor Angus Starling, Kenyan foreman Samuel, and Doctor David Hawthorne. Hawthorne tells Patterson of a recent lion attack that has affected the project.

That night, Patterson kills an approaching lion with one shot, earning the respect of the workers and bringing the project back on schedule. However, not long afterwards, Mahina, the construction foreman, is dragged from his tent in the middle of the night. His half-eaten body is found the next morning. Patterson then attempts a second night-time lion hunt, but the following morning, another worker is found dead at the opposite end of the camp from Patterson’s position.

Patterson’s only comfort now is the letters he receives from his wife. Soon, while the workers are gathering wood and building fire pits around the tents, a lion attacks the camp in the middle of the day, killing another worker. While Patterson, Starling and Samuel are tracking it to one end of the camp, another lion leaps upon them from the roof of a building, killing Starling with a slash to the throat and injuring Patterson on the left arm. Despite the latter’s efforts to kill them, both lions escape. Samuel states that there has never been a pair of man-eaters; they have always been solitary hunters.

The workers, led by Abdullah, begin to turn on Patterson. Work on the bridge comes to a halt. Patterson requests soldiers from England to protect the workers, but is denied. During a visit to the camp, Beaumont tells Patterson that he will ruin his reputation if the bridge is not finished on time and that he will contact the famous hunter Charles Remington to help because Patterson has been unable to kill the animals.

Remington arrives with skilled Maasai warriors to help kill the lions. They dub the lions “the Ghost” and “the Darkness” because of their notorious methods of attack. The initial attempt fails when Patterson’s borrowed gun misfires. The warriors decide to leave, but Remington stays behind. He constructs a new hospital for sick and injured workers and tempts the lions to the abandoned building with animal parts and blood. When the lions seemingly fall for the trap, Remington and Patterson shoot at them; but they flee and attack the new hospital, killing many patients and Hawthorne.

Abdullah and the construction men leave, and only Patterson, Remington, and Samuel remain behind. Patterson and Remington locate the animals’ lair, discovering the bones of dozens of the lions’ victims. That night, Remington kills one of the pair by using Patterson and a baboon as bait. The three hunters spend the evening drinking and celebrating but the next morning, Patterson awakes to find that the remaining lion has slaughtered Remington as he and Samuel slept. After the two men cremate Remington, they burn the tall grass surrounding the camp, driving the surviving lion toward the camp and the ambush that they set there. The lion attacks them on the partially constructed bridge, and after a lengthy fight Patterson finally kills it. Abdullah and the construction workers return, and the bridge is completed on time. Patterson reunites with his wife and meets his son for the first time.

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Categories
Nature

AWF: Manyara Ranch Conservancy

From a mismanaged cattle ranch to a prime wildlife area.

When African Wildlife Foundation began operating Manyara Ranch Conservancy, poaching was rampant in the area. Now, the 45,000 acre ranch is a well maintained wildlife corridor between Tanzania’s Tarangire and Manyara National Parks.

Video from African Wildlife Foundation.

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culture/tradition education Lessons from Experiences

Happy Teacher’s Day, 2019 and Thoughts on Growing Up

Ututu oma, ach, that’s good morning in English. It’s a bright and sunny morning and I wish I was in Kenya, watching wildlife.

World Teacher’s Day.

Today is Teacher’s Day! I celebrate all who share their knowledge with others, cheers and thanks for being a teacher. To parents, guardians, school tutors, clergymen, imams and everyone who teach in any capacity, you are awesome! As a teacher you are a life changer, great influence and the society owe you a lot.

Growing up.

Growing up wasn’t easy for me. I recall my school days as a timid child, a prey for bullies. There was this boy who found joy in bullying others and unfortunately I was one of his candidates. To cut the story short, he always roughed me up and made me run. So one day I decided to fight my Goliath. The fight bought my freedom and respect from others. I became courageous and self confident, afterwards. To get over a challenge, you must face it.

Well growing up wasn’t rosy either, I trekked to school, borrowed books to supplement study materials and disturbed my elder brothers and busy mom to teach me extra lessons. In high school, I was afraid of some teachers. This affected my grades, negatively. If a student hates a teacher, chances are that such student won’t perform well in the subject.

Now why do students hate teachers? I don’t think students hate teachers naturally. Maybe the teaching style, the dress code, the language and composure or self confidence doesn’t work well with them. There are many reasons, but I don’t think anyone would hate an open, funny and friendly person.

As a math teacher, I think that coercion is not the best way to teach. Teaching quantitative subjects like math require softness, kindness, flexibility, patience, tolerance and creativity. I will add that a math teacher should have a big heart too. Accommodating slow students can be challenging and tasking. Teachers should consider every child’s learning abilities. Different looks doesn’t really equate to different IQs. But having in mind that people are different helps. So there are fast learners and slow learners, fast writers and slow writers. Note that we can force a camel to the stream but we can’t force it to drink.

I wish you all a lovely weekend.

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Image from Indiatimes

Categories
Africa culture/tradition education Igbo culture Series Uncategorized

Why you should visit Africa 2

Do you find happiness and healing in natural things? Do you get inspiration from your natural environment? Do you like hanging out with the wild and getting blessed with views of a beautiful land? Maybe you love to watch the young deer gallivant through the Veldt. Then a visit to Africa will do.

I, for instance find inspiration for my writing when I travel to the countryside. The tranquility, people, scenario and diversity is enough inspiration and will surely thrill you! There’s always something to write about in Africa.

If you go for Safari, take a camera with you. Take many images or videos as you can. Because whatever you see is not something seen on a regular day! Feel free, enjoy the woods and wild. But do not venture away from your company. Wild animals may be on the prowl.

The most famous African Safari locations is in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Southern African countries. Infact the East of Africa has many game reserves, parks and zoological gardens. Masai Mara in Kenya is popular and hosts many visitors each year. There’s some nature parks in West Africa. The Yankari Game reserve is situated in Nigeria.

If you go to South Africa, you can even ride Ostriches and play with Cheetahs! Several countries have these wildlife protected and can sanction anyone who poach or steal from the Nature reserves. So remember not to take anything away, without permission.

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There’s many animal species here. Some are native to Africa, that is you can’t see them elsewhere! Watch out for Lion prides, for towers of Giraffes, entourage of Elephants, Monkeys and more. You might stay through the night. What you see is what is shown in NatGeoWild, just that this will be the live version!

Africa is surely, a land of diversity. There’s so much to do. So try to have fun when you visit Africa. Trust me, Africa is an amazing place and you won’t regret coming.

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Watch the sun rise

I watch the sun shine thru my window
Throwing me a familiar wink
And painting the curtain gold
Thru the city streets the lights glow
Like the color of brew which men drink
On all faces it shone, young and old

Day breaks again in the city
My heart long for something else
My dreams point to my calling;
A wheat farm and its serenity,
A pride of Lions in their lairs
Queer birds of Africa wailing

My heart is giving to the wild
I loath the noises of the city
The hustle bustle of strange people.
The twittering of birds are mild
It defined the inspiration in me
I am part of Nature, a true example

Africa is a wonder, a haven
I am given to Gods beautiful creations
My friends are what Nature offer:
Tridax, Drumstick, Marigold, Kenya, Bean
The Leopard, Hippo, Gazelle, Zambia, Lion
Waterfalls, hills, safari, ponds, all that are to wonder

Nothing compareS to this dream,
Let’s go find another land
Let’s go see what the Lord has for us!
The morning is handsomely warm
And the sun is scanning the land
A good day to ride, if I had a horse!

And someday soon, I’ll be there

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Uncategorized

Taming the Wild: Masai

Somewhere in Africa

Strong winds swept all to asunder
But the Masai march against it
With spears black with greasy hands
And faces painted like Halloweens ghosts
Pushing the tall shrubs down
Frighting lions off the forest paths
With bare hands they dare the buffaloes
And call to the Boar for duels
What manner of men, strange
The queer hue of pride and courage
Meshed in muscles and will
With strength for running the heights
Each man being a useful tool
Courage for the head to stay on its place
Throwing oneself to Fates’ mercy
The hope of a strong future
To be painted in the glory be told
And the unity of being one strong weapon
Driving against the wind up the hills
With their noses straightened to meet the air
They conquer all, man and beast

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Uncategorized

Africa

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Oh Africa!
The land of warriors
Of Shaka the Zulu
Land of great trees and waterfalls
The Victoria and the Chad
the Baobab and the Iroko
A land of green forests
With many faun and flora
A goldmine, a pouting sky
The wonders of Nature
A setting sun in the evening
Have you heard the tales
Of brave beast hunters
Home with life boas and alligators
Or driven down the roads
Of a modern Jo’burg
During a night sit out?
Have you seen the crags of Jos
And the Ohafia war dancers?
Have you seen the Kainji,
Or the ever dry Sahara?
Have you been to the Veldt
Or taken a safari thru Kenya’s forests
To see the wonders of the lakes
The river Orange and Lusaka?
When the sun rises
Hopes all rises with it
Have you seen the mountain Kilimanjaro
Or a hill leading the way to Umukwu, Ovim?
Have you heard the Lion
Roar so close to you
Or the trumpeting of Elephants
Confused and staring at you?
Come taste the sweet wonders
Of mother Natures best dishes
Come explore the lands
Where the sun shines always
Come see islands of the Cape Verde
And the wildlife that walk on Africa
Africa calls you
Have you seen my Africa?

Pictures: from Jim’s African Page

Oiroegbu Halls