Categories
Africa culture/tradition education folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral

Movie: The Ghost and the Darkness

As we observe our social distancing, I started seeing old favourite movies. I remember this historic film back in the days. Trust me, this is a thriller you will enjoy. Plot from Wikipedia.

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Plot: In 1898, Sir Robert Beaumont, the primary financier of a railroad project in Tsavo, Kenya, is furious because the project is running behind schedule. He seeks out the expertise of Lt. Colonel John Henry Patterson, a British military engineer, to get the project back on track. Patterson travels from England to Tsavo, telling his wife, Helena, he will complete the project and be back in London for the birth of their son. He meets British supervisor Angus Starling, Kenyan foreman Samuel, and Doctor David Hawthorne. Hawthorne tells Patterson of a recent lion attack that has affected the project.

That night, Patterson kills an approaching lion with one shot, earning the respect of the workers and bringing the project back on schedule. However, not long afterwards, Mahina, the construction foreman, is dragged from his tent in the middle of the night. His half-eaten body is found the next morning. Patterson then attempts a second night-time lion hunt, but the following morning, another worker is found dead at the opposite end of the camp from Patterson’s position.

Patterson’s only comfort now is the letters he receives from his wife. Soon, while the workers are gathering wood and building fire pits around the tents, a lion attacks the camp in the middle of the day, killing another worker. While Patterson, Starling and Samuel are tracking it to one end of the camp, another lion leaps upon them from the roof of a building, killing Starling with a slash to the throat and injuring Patterson on the left arm. Despite the latter’s efforts to kill them, both lions escape. Samuel states that there has never been a pair of man-eaters; they have always been solitary hunters.

The workers, led by Abdullah, begin to turn on Patterson. Work on the bridge comes to a halt. Patterson requests soldiers from England to protect the workers, but is denied. During a visit to the camp, Beaumont tells Patterson that he will ruin his reputation if the bridge is not finished on time and that he will contact the famous hunter Charles Remington to help because Patterson has been unable to kill the animals.

Remington arrives with skilled Maasai warriors to help kill the lions. They dub the lions “the Ghost” and “the Darkness” because of their notorious methods of attack. The initial attempt fails when Patterson’s borrowed gun misfires. The warriors decide to leave, but Remington stays behind. He constructs a new hospital for sick and injured workers and tempts the lions to the abandoned building with animal parts and blood. When the lions seemingly fall for the trap, Remington and Patterson shoot at them; but they flee and attack the new hospital, killing many patients and Hawthorne.

Abdullah and the construction men leave, and only Patterson, Remington, and Samuel remain behind. Patterson and Remington locate the animals’ lair, discovering the bones of dozens of the lions’ victims. That night, Remington kills one of the pair by using Patterson and a baboon as bait. The three hunters spend the evening drinking and celebrating but the next morning, Patterson awakes to find that the remaining lion has slaughtered Remington as he and Samuel slept. After the two men cremate Remington, they burn the tall grass surrounding the camp, driving the surviving lion toward the camp and the ambush that they set there. The lion attacks them on the partially constructed bridge, and after a lengthy fight Patterson finally kills it. Abdullah and the construction workers return, and the bridge is completed on time. Patterson reunites with his wife and meets his son for the first time.

Characters:

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Africa folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral

Rain!

Guess what!

Heaven’s tummy is rumbling! There’s some comfort from Heaven finally! It’s been hot since weekend, coupled with the Covid-19 issue, life has been solitary. Now it’s raining heavily outside! I’m seconds away from dancing in it but the lightning is frightening. I smell the wet dust. I’m sure mushrooms will visit tomorrow, haha. The breeze is flirting with my candle light and dancing with the curtains. The candle light draws a strange shadow over me. What a feeling! A joyful one, an escape from the heat.

This rain is a consolation and an answer to a prayer. Let’s see tomorrow. Good night.

Categories
Africa education lifestyle Nature

Leadership and Nigeria’s Covid-19 situation

As of March 29, confirmed Covid-19 cases in Nigeria rose to 111 and counting. The sad reality is that African leaders are not doing enough to prevent the virus from spreading further. Also, the testing equipment and medical personnel is NOT enough should the disease escalate. Even so, some people doubt the existence of Covid-19. They say it’s a hoax and a political one for that. You see, Nigerians politicize everything. Erosions, landslides, flooding, natural disasters, poverty are politicized and attributed to governments or opposition. Everything is reduced to lame blame games. When much time and energy is channeled to blames, very little is achieved. This is what the government and her opposition do to each other and to the citizenry. The citizens, on the other hand fight (verbally and in extreme cases via violence) amongst themselves to support and show solidarity to their various factions. Private businesses take advantage of situations like this to profit themselves by involving in dubious businesses and increasing cost of goods. Some people go about spreading false info. I don’t know their gain. There’s so much going on the fast lane but Covid-19 is a reality and it’s spreading. Like I always say the African problem is one of leadership. This is typical to Nigeria, where most think like their leaders. If the head is bad, there’s no doubt that the body will be twice as bad.

When I read people’s Covid-19 theories on social media. I can say that some people’s sense of reasoning is beclouded by sentiments and selfishness which somehow boils down to politics. Dear African leaders, everything is not about politics. Instead of pointing fingers, I think this is the time to find measures for collective public health safety.

Categories
lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

Remember 2

Remember…
My wrinkled lips were once your muse,
The moonshine and joyful tears we shared
Remember…
My shaky hands once held you while we danced
But will you forget my soul now my body is frail and old?

Categories
Africa education lifestyle

Need for an Afrocentric response to Covid-19

I received this thoughtful anonymous write up and like to share it with everyone.

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Dear Writers, can you help share this to get to the top before it is too late?

Is self-Isolation the best for Nigeria and Africa at the moment? Let’s look at its end result.

When I listen to young people that reason like Seun Kuti, it builds my hope that one day, the narratives will change for good.

Sometimes it seems we write or speak more intelligently than our leaders, it is not so because what we know, they equally know? But this is us telling the raw truth they have refused to tell you and will never tell you because they benefit more from shroud politics and fraudulent leadership, which by all means makes them appear unintelligent. And you as a citizen have not helped matters because you appear to be uninformed as to what your rights are and how to demand for it.

The People that created social distancing and self isolation against Covid-19 are the Europeans, because, that is what will work for them after putting one or two comprehensive analysis together.

The Chinese didn’t use social distancing and self isolation, they quarantined their people by force, because that is what will work for them at that moment.

But not only that, China were building and putting to use new hospitals every 6 days, to help get ahead of the virus, because many Chinese didn’t have access to healthcare and they understood what needed to be done which will work for them. Their response was completely Chinese and not African or European, they knew what China needed to move China fast out of the mess and that’s what they did.

So, when the virus got to Europe and the Europeans looked at their society and came up with social distancing and self isolation because they understood that that approach is what will help Europeans. Europeans don’t have communities that are without water, they don’t have communities without Hospitals, Europeans don’t live in face-me-I-face-you-houses, some of the homeless they have, they put them in government reserved shelters. Social distancing and self isolation is completely European and Eurocentric response to Covid-19, it is not Chinese response, it is their own Response. Europe doesn’t have slumps like where most people live in Aba, Lagos, Onitsha etc with gutters and shanties here and there. They don’t have communities without free water and electricity. Thus, self Isolation became easy.

But People buy water in Africa (Nigeria) to survive, some people don’t even have money to buy water. Now the Europeans that asked their people to self isolate, have created different types of funds to put in the pockets of their citizens to sustain them during the isolation period. But Nigerian medical professionals and politicians are shouting “Self Isolation and social distancing”, how many Nigerians can survive 2 weeks without hustling, without going to the streets to find daily bread?

By forcing Nigerians to self isolate without putting anything in their pockets, the government is only asking Nigerians to choose between death by Covid-19 or death by hunger. How have they saved Nigerians by this? This is not a response peculiar to our society.

You don’t bring an European trained doctor to treat malaria in Nigeria, malaria will kill a lot of people under his watch because he have no such experience. There’s no mosquito in Europe and so, there are no malaria cases for proper experience.

African leaders should be creative and stop the copycat. This is why we have remained slaves to the westerners. Depending on them for everything.
But African leaders all over the continent gives themselves the best in this world. They ride in the best cars, they wear the best cloths, they live in the best homes, access the best hospitals in the world, have the best security, send their children to the best schools in the world. They give themselves world class services with our commonwealth.

So, who taught you that you don’t have a right to demand for the best services from them? Who put it in your brains that you don’t deserve to ask them for world class services? Who put that in your brain? Is it your pastors, your parents, is it the dormant schools you went to? Guys, remove that … from your brain. Until the people learn to stand up and demand what’s due for them, nothing will change.

This social distancing and self isolation is not Afrocentric is not for Africans and will never work for Africans in this situation should it get out of hands. How are we going to sustain families during this isolation if the situation gets tough? This is the window period to think! Don’t let it hit us before we plan for it.

America with the lowest level of poverty is giving each adult a thousand dollars, (N380,000) but you are comfortable isolating without food.

Desperate situations requires desperate measures.

Categories
Africa culture/tradition education folklore Lessons from Experiences lifestyle Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Series

Self Reflection 22: Get Knowledge 2

A lack of knowledge creates fear, seeking knowledge creates courage.

NB: To reject something you know nothing about is ignorance.

Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore lifestyle Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

I hear you whisper

I hear you whisper in the morning,
Waking to your tweet and joyful song,
Lonely morning, seeds spread to the rising sun,
Fields of tropical wheat sing with the mountain,
And with you, beautiful birds; choir made in Heaven

Categories
Africa culture/tradition education folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Series

Self Reflection 21: Faith 2

Believing is seeing, not the other way round.

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Africa culture/tradition education folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Series

I choose Faith over Fear

Just few months ago the world celebrated the new year. People, companies and countries nurtured aspirations and dreams, hoping for a happy year. But the advent of the virus brought fear and uncertainty. With what is going on, this pandemic may cause economic stress across the globe, particularly in Africa.I’m happy it’s Friday evening. All primary and secondary schools in Abia State closed today. So holidays have officially started. Due to the sit at home notice issued by the government I may not travel home. I’m sitting outside, to enjoy some quietness and breeze. I wonder how long we’ll wait to hear that the virus is gone. I’m not afraid, the world have suffered worse before now.In my area, there’s no news of the virus yet. People still go about their business despite the warnings. I’m grateful to all fighting this scourge and I pray for those who doubt the existence of a Supreme God. In these times and always, I choose faith over fear. Life is surely vanity without faith.Let’s stay safe and be grateful for life. My thoughts and prayers to you all. I know we’ll smile again. Good night 💛💚💙

Categories
culture/tradition lifestyle Nature Pastoral Series

Self Reflection 20: Dream

If you can dream it, you can do it

_Walt Disney

Categories
Africa folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

Modern Chaos

Untarred dusty roads, free wind beat
Ancient hills hanging in the smog,
While heaps of trash greet travelers
Airy morning now, cheerful birds sing
Smell of gutted fruits and vegetables,
Markets swam with strange faces
Human stench overwhelm the breeze
At the distance, grasslands burn
Hawks descend upon thick smoke
As the fire lick the grasses away
Smell of a flowing stream nearby
Empty cattle, pig and sewage waste

Into wetlands and our minds to paint
A picture of nature in modern chaos

Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

Stars Glitter for you

Stars glitter for you
When you look up the skies

Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore Igbo culture lifestyle Nature Pastoral Series

Diaries of a Village boy: The Leopard spirit 7

Papa said I had to be strong to attend the next Tales by Moonlight night. He also promised I could play and hunt with other children if I got well fast. So I took my medication and exercise seriously. The moonlight night tales come once in a fortnight, sometimes it may be delayed especially during the rainy and farming season. It was every child’s wish to listen to those ancient tales sitting outside, under a tree and the feel of fresh air on their bare skin. The old women who told the tales were called mama and sometimes brought fresh coconut juice and pieces of dried bush meat for everyone. The moonlight nights were secret rendezvous for young lovers. In fact, this was the major reason many teens looked forward to the event. Before the tales are told, some older children organise quizzes, talkshows, debates and games like wrestling, hides and seek and nchokotoro, which was girls favourite game. The boys will gather, not to play but to cheer their crush. I can’t remember exactly what moral I learned in the past tales but I was determined not to miss the next.

But who knew what may happen to me next? All the dibia, Papa brought had failed to cage the spirit and each time I came under an attack I was left at the mercy of other people. So I couldn’t control it. Each day, I grew afraid of myself and wished I could live my life as a normal boy. Who says you are not normal? I felt a voice question. There were strange voices in my head. Mild, sometimes harsh but never sinister. I could connect to it somehow, but not for long. This was a mystery unknown even to Papa and he was not happy seeing his son suffer for nothing. Maybe I could find out what I could achieve with this power. Just maybe, only that a Leopard is not faint hearted like myself. I shrugged at the thought of comparing myself to Leopards. In character and thought, I was just the opposite of it.

My friends came that afternoon to check on me. I smiled at their goofy locally made fishing suits. Odo had made one for himself from a fishing net. He wore it to my room and was narrating how the villagers admired and watched him as he walked through the clan. I knew he was bragging, I saw nothing special in his new fishing net suit. The boys brought some Udala and mango. Ah! I knew my friends were not privileged like myself to attend school but I would never trade them for anything!

“Thanks guys!”

“Have you heard that the strange crocodile has resurfaced and is even digging again?” Obi asked, cutting my greeting off.

“That’s old news. The animal has turned our clean stream water into mud, we can’t even use the stream anymore.” Odo replied.

“Really?” I asked. “I thought it was captured when I was away?”

“No nah. The hunters caught a beaver. A beaver is not a crocodile.” Chimdi answered. She was the only girl friend in our midst. She seldom spoke and will always be the first to laugh when the boys come to mischief.

“Can you cook or bath with mud?” Odo ignored her.

“Well, the Igwe has summoned a hunting party at his palace. I knew because my father is a volunteer for the hunt.” Ekeledi added. He was handsome. But he was a stammerer and pronounced each word after striking his foot on the floor. He got angry easily and will hit anyone with any available object…

To be continued…

Categories
Africa education lifestyle Nature Poetry

Discrimination: Who’s the enemy now?

I watch the news daily for updates on Covid-19. I’m glad to see heartwarming stories of our success in the fight against the global spread or containment of the virus. I read that Cuban doctors and nurses are in Italy to help out. Now, this is good news and I expect to see more.

The other side of the coin isn’t so bright. It’s sad to read of xenophobia in these trying times. How can we show love to people if we harbour mistrust, old grudges or plain hatred? My faith believes that to win means to love even your enemies. In Europe and America, cases of physical violence and abuse on people of Asian descent are reported. This is not humanity, this is not love.

There’s too much suffering and dying already, let’s not contribute to it. It’s unfair and not the best time to discriminate or segregate, but time to act together in love, commitment and kindness to one another as one human unit.

Stay safe everyone. My thoughts and prayers go to Italy.

Categories
Africa culture/tradition education folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Series

Self Reflection 19: Get Knowledge

Not to know is bad, not to wish to know is worse. African proverb.

Categories
culture/tradition lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

Dream

You came as a Dream to me
This Dream has made me beautiful

Categories
Africa lifestyle Series

Just In: Jack Ma’s donation arrives

Medical supplies to fight Coronavirus donated by Chinese billionaire, Jack Ma, arrives Nigeria

The shipment, which came in via an Ethiopian Airlines flight, carried 5.4 million face masks, 1.08 million detection tests, 40,000 sets of protective clothing and 60,000 sets of protective face shields.

I hope this will help curb the spreading of the virus. Stay safe everyone.

Source: SaharaReporters

Categories
Africa lifestyle Nature Pastoral

Creative Baking: Senocreme

Maya Angelou opined that one can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.

Join me to welcome my guest, Seno Ukpe, a friend from Akwa Ibom state and CEO Senocreme.

Meeting Seno, some years back in University of Uyo, I didn’t observe she had an enterprising mindset. Smart and taciturn, I was sure that she would become a budding baking celebrity in the city of Uyo. So when she transformed an idea into reality and became a mentor in her field, I wasn’t surprised. I love good food and will celebrate anyone who makes some!

Seno is taciturn yet what strikes me when she speak is her confidence and that’s a great way to start a success story. Her passion for baking is outstanding, it even reflects on her work as you can see in the images.

As I say, a good baker is a good mathematician. Timeliness, grit and creativity are calculative spicing in every good cooking and Senocreme gives the best experience.

Honestly, I would let my pen rest and eat a fistful.

If you are interested in cakes and bake mentoring, drop a message or reach out to her. I know she will be more than happy to help. Thank you Senocreme for your time.

Check out her Facebook and Twitter pages @senocreme

Categories
Africa education lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

Covid-19 Update in Nigeria

The virus is still at large and people move about freely as usual. Some news agencies reveal frightening figures. I can’t confirm these figures yet. Most public places; markets, schools and religious places are open.

Please keep us in your prayers. For those without Africa we have you in our thoughts too. Stay safe everyone.

Categories
folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

Self Reflection 18: Hope

Smile my friends,
Nothing, no problem lasts

Categories
folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

Muse: Our idea

I love the idea of you and I
Riding to the setting sun
I see where the country ends
But our love will never die

Categories
culture/tradition lifestyle Nature Series

Self Reflection 17: Companionship

Surround yourself with worthy people. Your network is your net worth.

Categories
Africa culture/tradition lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry Series

Mother

Love is a beautiful journey in your eyes,
You cook all day to feed our hungry selves
And you eat only when we’re satisfied,
Our first teacher, lover and my citadel
You are a hero, you are my hero!

Your love is restraint and inspiration
Like the hen, sheltering chicks with her wings,
You teach our hearts the world’s rhythm
So I sing for you, in my heart anytime I see you;
Mama you are a hero, you are truly my hero!!

***

It’s Mothers Week in my local church, Methodist Church Nigeria. I felt I could do a line or two to express my warm feelings for mothers. Happy Mothers Week to my super mom, Helen Iroegbu, to every woman who had contributed to my growth and mothers all over the globe. You all will continue to be our first love.

Categories
culture/tradition education lifestyle Love and Christianity Nature Pastoral

Self Reflection 16: Look beyond

Look beyond the mirror called self.

Categories
Africa folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

Beautiful Spring

Rainfall or shine, flowers and bird calls
Squirrels and trees, spring brightens all
Dwell in tree houses, sit out in beaches,
Live in the beauty within and without you

Categories
Africa lifestyle Nature Pastoral

To my First Grays

You make me look old
Like the folktales I told
I wish away old age
But they say gray is sage
I feel happy warmth,
When I muse over it

Categories
culture/tradition education lifestyle Nature Pastoral

Self Reflection 15: Compassion

Consideration for others is the basis of a good life, a good society.

Categories
folklore Nature Pastoral Poetry

Galaxies

Galaxies shine,
Cloudy night they belong
Sea breeze play with waves

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Africa education lifestyle

Update on Covid19

The World Health Organisation (WHO) asked African leaders and health institutions to prepare for the worst. I’m afraid, African leaders are doing little or NOTHING to prevent the spread of the virus. Moreover, health institutions in Africa is in shambles, so I don’t know how we will be preparing to prevent the spread of Covid19 with all these drama. In Nigeria for instance, life goes on as usual. Public associations and places are not limited, restricted or isolated respectively. Markets, schools, and religious centers are still open. Morning news headlines read that there are 8 confirmed Covid19 cases in the country. The figures may be growing elsewhere in Africa! People make joke of the virus, thinking that the virus is ineffective in the tropics. But I’m not bothered about this goof, I think that more should be done on providing education on the virus.

As much of Africa’s population live in remote/rural areas, disseminating relevant information may be difficult. The government, nay everyone can a role. While NGO’s can help educate the rural populace about the virus, teachers in schools can suspend some lessons to teach students about it too. Taking Covid29 lightly may bring unforeseen mayhem. I plead with bloggers to share information on the virus. Information is power. Let us help stem this scourge.

#coronakindness

Categories
Africa culture/tradition lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

My Friend, the Free Wind

I like that I soak in the rain,
Catching water drops
That melt before my eyes
I play with Nature’s gifts,
Dancing with the wind,
My free, worthy friend!
Rejoicing when our pots fill
To embrace mother Nature’s bliss

Categories
folklore Nature Pastoral Poetry

Beauty

Beauty is the ladybird
Waking in the midst of dew
To enjoy a quiet and lonely walk

Categories
Africa education lifestyle Nature

Thoughts on Africa and Covid19

I follow recent global events with keen interest. I’m worried and hope that this scourge end soon. I’m aware that the growing pandemic is leading lesser economic activities across the globe and this may cause hard times for African economies in particular.

Most African nations depend solely on exports for survival. Nigeria, like many other countries depend on crude oil, solid minerals and agro product export. Imagine what will happen when foreign borders, economic and physical are closed and there is no market. Now let me highlight Africa’s major problem as public resource mismanagement. When public resources are hijacked by bad leaders with no foresight and ineffective economic planning, growth is retarded. Corruption and political instability has led Africa down the wrong path and it has become the way of life in some nations. Now we face a bigger problem which our leaders may downplay as well.

If leaders utilized those plundered resources to create opportunities and diversify our economy, we may stand in a position to render help to other nations. But of course, we are always at the receiving end, receiving both mercy and pity. American, Chinese and European agencies are worried that Africa may not be able to contain Covid19 should it escalate. What can I say?

I write from my bed, these thoughts refused to let me be. Good night everyone.

#coronakindness

Categories
Africa education lifestyle

Update: Covid19 in Africa

This image from CGTN Africa show African countries with confirmed Covid19 cases.

Stay safe everyone.

#coronakindness

Categories
folklore Nature Pastoral Poetry

Spring

Green and red leaves may fall
When spring sing from tree tops
And blue skies are her muse

Categories
culture/tradition folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Series

Folklore: The Straw, the Coal and the Bean from Gutenberg Project

In a village dwelt a poor old woman, who had gathered together a dish of beans and wanted to cook them. So she made a fire on her hearth and that it might burn the quicker, she lighted it with a handful of straw. When she was emptying the beans into the pan, one dropped without her observing it, and lay on the ground beside a straw, and soon afterwards a burning coal from the fire leapt down to the two. Then the straw began and said: ‘Dear friends, from whence do you come here?’ The coal replied: ‘I fortunately sprang out of the fire, and if I had not escaped by sheer force, my death would have been certain,–I should have been burnt to ashes.’ The bean said: ‘I too have escaped with a whole skin, but if the old woman had got me into the pan, I should have been made into broth without any mercy, like my comrades.’ ‘And would a better fate have fallen to my lot?’ said the straw. ‘The old woman has
destroyed all my brethren in fire and smoke; she seized sixty of them at once, and took their lives. I luckily slipped through her fingers.’

‘But what are we to do now?’ said the coal.

‘I think,’ answered the bean, ‘that as we have so fortunately escaped death, we should keep together like good companions, and lest a new mischance should overtake us here, we should go away together, and repair to a foreign country.’

The proposition pleased the two others, and they set out on their way together. Soon, however, they came to a little brook, and as there was no bridge or foot-plank, they did not know how they were to get over it. The straw hit on a good idea, and said: ‘I will lay myself straight across, and then you can walk over on me as on a bridge.’ The straw therefore stretched itself from one bank to the other, and the coal, who was of an impetuous disposition, tripped quite boldly on to the newly-built bridge. But when she had reached the middle, and heard the water rushing beneath her, she was after all, afraid, and stood still, and ventured no farther. The straw, however, began to burn, broke in two pieces, and fell into the stream. The coal slipped after her, hissed when she got into the water, and breathed her last. The bean, who had prudently stayed behind on the shore, could not but laugh at the event, was unable to stop, and laughed so heartily that she burst. It would have been all over with her, likewise, if, by good fortune, a tailor who was travelling in search of work, had not sat down to rest by the brook. As he had a compassionate heart he pulled out his needle and thread, and sewed her together. The bean thanked him most prettily, but as the tailor used black thread, all beans since then have a black seam.

Categories
culture/tradition lifestyle Nature Pastoral Series

Self Reflection 14: Courage

Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, while loving someone deeply gives you courage.

Lao Tzu
Categories
lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

Muse: Think of us

Think of a future together,
Let it go if you can’t see one

Categories
Africa culture/tradition folklore lifestyle Nature Pastoral Poetry

Wait on the Stars

Night is falling,
I wait on the stars
To tell a tale or two

Categories
culture/tradition education lifestyle Pastoral

The Magic in a Smile

A smile is the prettiest thing you can wear. Let me tell you a story of how my experience got me an intern position in a leading Nigerian bank. In 2010, I was privileged to sit for a recruitment test in my school. The test was supervised by representatives of Diamond Bank Nigeria PLC, now Access Bank Nigeria PLC, a major financial services provider, who were scouting for interns. About 2000 applicants were pre-selected from different departments. I remember that the first test was a written essay and as someone who enjoyed writing, I found it easy to navigate through. The next day, applicants were asked to check a shortlist pasted on the notice board. We were advised to wait for an open interview if our names appeared on the list. I was nervous, and wasn’t sure that I would make it as other applicants were as good as myself. Anyway, when I checked and saw that I was among the shortlisted 99 applicants, I knew that I had to face one more hurdle: the interview. At first I was happy that my essay was good enough. But there was no time to prepare for the interview, I could only adjust my shirt while observing myself from the hall window.

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Few hours later we were ushered into school auditorium. As it was an open interview, the academic faculty were invited to see our performance. It was a long wait for me, as my name fell somewhere between 50-60 in the list. I remember how I felt when my time finally came. As the interviewer walked over to me, my hands shook in fear. To contain this, I shoved my fingers into my trouser pockets,  but it wouldn’t stop! So I pulled them out and decided to face the panel. The interviewer observed my dressing and when he was close I smiled, nervously. He nodded and ticked something on his book. When he raised his head he asked me a question on math. Thankfully, I had experience teaching algebra. So I gave him an answer after solving the problem on paper.He disagreed with my first answer. I attempted the question again and again. I continued trying as he said no each time I gave a wrong answer. Luckily, I got the answer before my interview time could elapse. I thought as I took time to get the answer I wouldn’t make it to the last list. When I sat down, my seat mates offered me handshakes and said I answered the toughest question in the interview.   When the last candidate was interviewed it was past 7PM in the evening. It was then that the interviewer and his crew called out the names of successful candidates. 50 of 99 applicants made it through and I was one of them! It was an exciting and unforgettable moment for me. The interviewer congratulated us and explained why we were selected. First, we smiled. As providing good service and customer satisfaction are central to bank ethics; working with the public required patience, understanding and tolerance. Also some were selected for their persistence, appearance or determination.Few months later I received a message for me to report to Imo State Secretariat Mini branch, Owerri, Nigeria as Cash Services Representative. Indeed, smiles can create doors where they never existed and when knowledge fail, smiles give confidence to carry on.

***

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Categories
Africa culture/tradition education lifestyle Pastoral Series

Thoughts: Friends Vs Foes 2

After watching this funny video I concluded that people are not always what they seem. Friends, colleagues and even family members may sabotage someone’s effort thereby becoming a hindrance to that person’s progress. Keep in mind that we can achieve progress when everyone in our boat is rowing with and not against us.

***

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